Stanford-LPCH
Vaccine Program

Clinical Trials

Current Studies


Completed Studies



Flu

Immune Senescence in the Elderly: Comparison of Immune Reponses to Influenza Vaccine in Adults of Different Age Groups

 




FluSeasonal Flu Vaccine Study: For 8-33 years old
Vaccination and infection: indicators of immunological health and responsiveness; Project 1: Plasmablast trafficking and antibody response in influenza vaccination. (SLVP021) - 2013

 


ILIImmune Responses to Influenza-like Illness








Flu
Seasonal Flu Vaccine Study: For 18-30 years old

(Fall 2012 HIPC IOF: The Human Mucosal Immune Responses to Influenza Virus: A Systems Biology Approach: CCHI DF: Innate Immune Responses to Influenza Virus in Single Human Nasal Epithelial Cells)

T-CellSeasonal Flu Vaccine Study (T-cell  Responses 2012-2013)
T-cell and General Immune Responses to Influenza, Single-cell Phospho-protein Signaling Analysis of the Response to Influenza Vaccination and Measuring the Immunome: Genomic Approaches to B-cell Repertoire




SHIMR

Seasonal Flu Vaccine Study: For 18-32 years old

Vaccination and infection: indicators of immunological health and responsiveness; Project 1: Plasmablast trafficking and antibody response in influenza vaccination - 2012 (Referrals from past studies only)

 


FluStanford Flu Vaccine Study: For 18-30 years old
Spring 2012 Pilot Study in Young Adults to Examine the Kinetics of Changes in the B-cell Repertoire Following TIV Immunization




The research will be conducted at Stanford University by Dr. Cornelia L. Dekker, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics at Stanford (Stanford-LPCH Vaccine Program), Mark Davis, Ph.D. (Institute of Immunity Transplantation and Infection) and Dr. Stephen Quake, Professor of Bioengineering, Co-Chair, Department of Bioengineering.




2009 Novel H1N1 Flu Vaccine Study (Enrollment Closed)

A Phase II Study in Healthy Adult and Elderly Populations to Assess the Safety and Immunogenicity of a Sanofi Pasteur H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Administered at Different Dose Levels Given With and Without Glaxo SmithKline AS03 Adjuvant (DMID 09-0058)

SUMMARY The Stanford-LPCH Vaccine Program is seeking healthy adults to take part in a novel H1N1 flu vaccine study.  The purpose of this trial is to study the immune responses to two doses of the novel H1N1 flu vaccine when given with or without an adjuvant.  The research will be conducted at Stanford University by Cornelia L. Dekker, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics.  This trial is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).





Immune Responses to the Influenza Vaccine in Persons with Mitochondrial Disease (MELAS)

SUMMARY The Stanford-LPCH Vaccine Program is seeking healthy adolescents and adults to participate in an influenza (commonly known as "the flu") vaccine research study to better understand effects of immunizations for people with MELAS syndrome.  We will enroll 15 healthy male and female adult participants (18-65 years old) along with 15 otherwise healthy adolescents and adults (12-60 years old) who have one of the genetic changes associated with a metabolic disorder called MELAS syndrome.




ILI

Flu Study 2012, Immune Responses to Influenza-like Illness




B-Cell2011 Seasonal Flu Vaccine Study (B-cell)

B-cell Immunity to Influenza and Measuring the Immunome: Genomic Approaches to B-cell Repertoire






T-CellSeasonal Flu Vaccine Study (T-cell  Responses 2011-2012)
T-cell and General Immune Responses to Influenza, Single-cell Phospho-protein Signaling Analysis of the Response to Influenza Vaccination and Measuring the Immunome: Genomic Approaches to B-cell Repertoire


SHIMR

Seasonal Flu Vaccine Study: For 18-49 years old

Vaccination and infection: indicators of immunological health and responsiveness; Project 1: Plasmablast trafficking and antibody responses in influenza vaccination




T-CellSeasonal Flu Vaccine Study
T-cell and General Immune Responses to Influenza, Single-cell Phospho-protein Signaling Analysis of the Response to Influenza Vaccination and Measuring the Immunome: Genomic Approaches to B-cell Repertoire


2008 Flu Vaccine Study for Toddlers


lady bug3

Kinetics of B-Cell Reponses to Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine (LAIV) in Young Children Two Years of Age


Vero Cell-Culture Derived Avian Flu Vaccine Study

Official Title:  A Phase I, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Dose-Ranging Clinical Trial of the Safety, Reactogenicity, and Immunogenicity of Intramuscular Immunization With Inactivated, Vero Cell-Culture Derived Influenza A/H5N1 Vaccine Given Alone or With Aluminum Hydroxide to Healthy Young Adults (DMID 06-0052)
Southern Hemisphere Seasonal Flu Vaccine Study
Official Title: A Phase III, Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Study to Evaluate the Immunogenicity, Safety, and Tolerability of CSL Limited Inactivated Influenza Vaccine in Adults ≥18 to <65 Years of Age (DMID 06-0016)
Avian Flu Vaccine Study With Adjuvants
Official Title: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase I/II, Dose-Ranging Study of the Safety, Reactogenicity, and Immunogenicity of Intramuscular Inactivated Influenza A/H5N1 Vaccine with Different Adjuvants in Healthy Adults (DMID 04-062)
Intramuscular vs. Intradermal Seasonal Flu Vaccine

Official Title: Immunogenicity and Safety of a Split, Inactivated, Trivalent Influenza Vaccine Administered by Intradermal Route Compared to an Intramuscular Vaccination With Fluzone in Healthy Adults (DMID 05-0075)
TIV vs. LAIV- Adults
Official Title:  Influenza Immunity: Protective Mechanisms Against a Pandemic Respiratory Virus (SLVP 007)-Adults
Influenza causes natural pandemics, which can incapacitate a large fraction of the population.  The purpose of these Phase IV, NIH-sponsored clinical trials is to provide a better understanding the natural and adaptive immune response to the flu virus so that more effective vaccines can be developed.  Volunteers received one of two licensed influenza vaccines, either inactivated vaccine given IM or live, attenuated vaccine given intranasally.  Detailed studies of antibody, CD4 & CD8 T-cell and NK cell studies are performed as part of this large Program Project. A series of studies will be conducted over a five-year period.

Year 1

Year 2
Year 3
TIV vs. LAIV- Children
The purpose of these Phase IV, NIH-sponsored clinical trials is to provide valuable information about how children develop immunity to influenza following flu immunization.  Studies of CD4, CD8 T-cells, B-cells and antibody responses to influenza vaccine strains are performed.  These studies are associated with the TIV vs. LAIV adult studies titled Influenza Immunity: Protective Mechanisms Against a Pandemic Respiratory Virus.

Year 2
Official Title: Open-label Study of the Immunogenicity of an Inactivated Influenza Vaccine Given to Previously Unimmunized Children Between 6 Months and 5 Years of Age. Subset Follow-up for Nasal Swabs for Influenza PCR (SLVP010): Year 2 Year 2
Official Title: A Randomized Comparison of the Immune Response to Either Inactivated or Live, Attenuated Influenza Vaccine in Children 5-9 Years of Age. Subset Follow-up for NP Samples for Influenza PCR (SLVP011): Year 2   Year 3
Official Title:  A Randomized Comparison of the Immune Response to Either Inactivated or Live, Attenuated Influenza Vaccine in Children 5-9 Years of Age (SLVP-011): Year 3
A Phase I/II Clinical Trial Evaluating the Safety and Immunogencity of LC16m8, A Modified Vaccinia Vaccine, in Healthy Volunteers
Immune Response to Influenza in Young Children Immunized with Trivalent Inactivated Influenza Vaccine (TIV).
Antiviral Immune Mechanisms in Early Childhood
Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Infection and Immunity In Healthy Adults
A Multicenter, Double Blind, Randomized Dose-Response Study of Dryvax Vaccine Against Smallpox in Previously Vaccinated Adults
Radiologic Imaging Study of the Bowel in Young Children with Rotavirus Infection

 

 

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